The FCC has unanimously adopted an order to revoke China Unicom Americas’ section 214 authorizations. This action follows the FCC order in October 2021 to revoke China Telecom Americas’ authorizations. These license revocations demonstrate that the severe actions against Chinese telecoms with apparent affiliations with the Chinese government and military that began in the last

On September 21, 2021, the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Competition Policy, Antitrust, and Consumer Rights held a hearing on Big Data, Big Questions: Implications for Competition and Consumers. This hearing was part of a series of hearings on a bipartisan review of competition issues in America. Senator Klobuchar led the hearing, with Senators Lee, Blumenthal, Hawley, Ossoff, Blackburn, and Cruz contributing questions to the witnesses. The witnesses included representatives from technology companies, an author, and a director of a nonprofit.
Continue Reading Takeaways from U.S. Senate Hearing on Big Data, Big Questions: Implications for Competition and Consumers

On June 25, 2021, the U.S. Supreme Court in TransUnion LLC v. Ramirez (No. 20-297, slip op.) clarified that for standing purposes in federal courts, an important difference exists between (i) a plaintiff’s statutory cause of action to sue over a violation of law, and (ii) a plaintiff suffering concrete harm because of the violation of law. The Court stated that “an injury in law is not an injury in fact” and held that only those plaintiffs who suffer a “concrete injury” apart from the violation of law alone have standing to sue. This case involved TransUnion’s alleged inaccurate reporting of class members as potential threats to America’s national security. Only a subset of the class, however, was the subject of these incorrect reports provided to third parties, and the Court acknowledged only these individuals as having standing to sue.
Continue Reading Recent Federal Court Decisions Creating Uncertainty Around CCPA Standing

It is no secret that artificial intelligence (“AI”) is set to become the next wave in technological innovation. AI is expected to create as many as 133 million new jobs by 2022 and boost the global economy by $13 trillion by 2030. However, successful machine learning depends on large and broad data sets, including personal information, and the extraordinary pace of development is forcing nations to reevaluate their laws in order to compete within the industry.
Continue Reading Promoting and Regulating Artificial Intelligence